Accommodation

Wild South Coast Way on the Heysen Trail

The Wild South Coast Way on the Heysen Trail (WSCW) is a fully customisable, multi-day walking experience between Cape Jervis and Victor Harbor on the Fleurieu Peninsula, South Australia.

Walk the Wild South Coast Way your own way – any day, any direction, any section. From day visits with short loop walks to the full five-day four-night experience and everything in between, the WSCW allows walkers to choose their own adventure.

The walking experience offers some of the state’s most spectacular and awe inspiring coastal walking imaginable. The WSCW provides visitors a genuine sense of wilderness, featuring remote beaches, native bushland, rugged cliffs, First Nations’ history, breathtaking vistas, deep gullies and a rich diversity of native birds, bush and wildlife, in fact more species than anywhere else on the coast.

Each day of the walk delivers a new experience and challenge, starting with views across to Kangaroo Island before the full nature experience begins, encouraging the walker to ‘tune in’ to nature and ‘tune out’ of stress.

The trail connects the parks along our breathtaking southern coastline from Cape Jervis to Victor Harbor including Deep Creek National Park, Ballaparudda Creek Recreation Park and Newland Head Conservation Park. If doing a multi-day walk, camp at one of the park campgrounds along the way: there are four walk-in only campgrounds and four drive-in campgrounds on or near the trail.

  • Kurri Ngawanthi (Creek Campground)

    Pro­nounced Koor-ee Ngah-wun-thee and locat­ed on the Wild South Coast Way on the Hey­sen Trail in Bal­la­parud­da Creek Recre­ation Park, this is a hik­er-only camp­ground. This loca­tion is the site of the for­mer Balquhid­der Camp­site. Set in between rolling hills and next to Bal­la­parud­da Creek, the camp­ground is a great place to unwind, relax and enjoy the scenery. You’re like­ly to hear a sym­pho­ny of frogs when the creek is flow­ing, as the healthy envi­ron­ment here sup­ports sev­er­al species. Facil­i­ties include a camp shel­ter with tables, bench and basin and near­by toi­let. Camp­fires pro­hib­it­ed at all times. Camp­ing capac­i­ty is max­i­mum 20 guests with 10 allo­cat­ed camp­sites (max­i­mum 2 peo­ple per site). Camp­sites are either plat­form or com­pact­ed earth. Unpow­ered. This is a hik­er-only camp­site with no vehi­cle park­ing or vehi­cle access.
  • Natunyuru Ngawanthi (Sand Dunes campground)

    Pro­nounced Nut-un-yoo-roo Ngah-wun-thee and locat­ed on the Wild South Coast Way on the Hey­sen Trail in New­land Head Con­ser­va­tion Park, this is a hik­er-only camp­ground. Sur­round­ed by coastal white mallee, this camp­ground pro­vides a seclud­ed area to relax after tra­vers­ing the coastal cliffs or long sandy beach­es. The mallee canopy pro­vides a per­fect envi­ron­ment for the small orchids that thrive here and the echid­nas that wan­der through search­ing for their next meal. Facil­i­ties include a camp shel­ter with tables, bench and basin and near­by toi­let. Camp­fires are pro­hib­it­ed at all times. Camp­ing capac­i­ty is max­i­mum 20 guests with 10 allo­cat­ed camp­sites (max­i­mum 2 peo­ple per site). Camp­sites are com­pact­ed earth. Unpow­ered. This is a hik­er-only camp­site with no vehi­cle park­ing or access
  • Wuldi Krikin Ngawanthi (Eagle Waterhole)

    Pro­nounced Wool-dee Krik-ren Ngah-wun-thee and locat­ed on the Hey­sen Trail in Deep Creek Nation­al Park, this is a hik­er-only camp­ground. Nes­tled amongst shady gum trees and icon­ic yac­cas, this camp­ground gives a real sense of being in the wilder­ness. Fern-lined gul­lies, cas­cad­ing water­falls and a spec­tac­u­lar coast­line of cliffs and seclud­ed coves are all a short jour­ney from here. Facil­i­ties include a camp shel­ter with tables, bench and basin and near­by toi­let. Camp­fires pro­hib­it­ed at all times. Camp­ing capac­i­ty is max­i­mum 20 guests with 10 allo­cat­ed camp­sites (max­i­mum 2 peo­ple per site). Camp­sites are raised tim­ber plat­forms or com­pact­ed earth. Unpow­ered. This is a hik­er-only camp­site with no vehi­cle park­ing or access. If you are leav­ing a vehi­cle in Deep Creek Nation­al Park overnight, you must pay a vehi­cle day entry fee for each day you are in the park. Vehi­cles may only be parked at day vis­i­tor areas.
  • Yapari Ngawanthi (Cliffs campground)

    Pro­nounced Yah-pah-ree Ngah-wun-thee and locat­ed on the Wild South Coast Way on the Hey­sen Trail in Deep Creek Nation­al Park, this is a hik­er-only camp­ground. Set below a canopy of stringy­bark trees, the camp­ground is a great place to unwind, relax and enjoy the scenery. An ele­vat­ed plat­form pro­vides fan­tas­tic ocean views over the tree­tops. Facil­i­ties include a camp shel­ter with tables, bench and basin and near­by toi­let. Camp­fires are pro­hib­it­ed at all times. Camp­ing capac­i­ty is max­i­mum 20 guests with 10 allo­cat­ed camp­site (max­i­mum 2 peo­ple per site). Camp­sites are either plat­form or earth. Unpow­ered. This is a hik­er-only camp­site with no vehi­cle park­ing or vehi­cle access. If you are leav­ing a vehi­cle in Deep Creek Nation­al Park overnight, you must pay a vehi­cle day entry fee for each day you are in the park. Vehi­cles may only be parked at day vis­i­tor areas.