Adelaide International Bird Sanctuary National Park - Winaityinaityi Pangkara

Adelaide International Bird Sanctuary National Park - Winaityinaityi Pangkara

Adelaide International Bird Sanctuary National Park – Winaityinaityi Pangkara will be closed to visitors from 6pm Thursday 22 February until 5pm Tuesday 27 February 2024 while pest animal control is undertaken in the area. Details

Buckland Park section (south of Port Gawler Road) will be closed from 5am - 12pm every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday and from 4pm - 12am Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thu from 1 July 2023 to 30 September 2024. Open at other times. Details

Park fees:
Free entry
28.25km from Adelaide
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The Bird Sanc­tu­ary encom­pass­es over 60km of coast­line north of Ade­laide, adja­cent to Gulf St Vin­cent, Adelaide’s north­ern sub­urbs and spans across four local coun­cil areas. With­in the bird sanc­tu­ary sits the Ade­laide Inter­na­tion­al Bird Sanc­tu­ary Nation­al Park — Winaity­i­naityi Pangkara. Winaity­i­naityi Pangkara means a coun­try for all birds and the coun­try that sur­rounds these birds’ in the lan­guage of the Kau­r­na people.

The Bird Sanc­tu­ary sits right at the south­ern end of the East Asian-Aus­tralasian Fly­way (EAAF) and is one of the key feed­ing and roost­ing sites for migra­to­ry birds who use the fly­way each year. Birds fly from as far as Siberia and Alas­ka, pass­ing through 22 coun­tries. The area acts as a cru­cial habi­tat on this migra­to­ry route which is used by more than 5 mil­lion birds a year, 27,000 of which call Ade­laide Inter­na­tion­al Bird Sanc­tu­ary home.

Whilst being one of Adelaide’s longest con­tin­u­ous con­ser­va­tion areas, the Bird Sanc­tu­ary is home to 263 unique fau­na and flo­ra species. In par­tic­u­lar, the Bird Sanc­tu­ary helps pro­tect res­i­dent and migra­to­ry shore­birds, includ­ing threat­ened species such as Curlew sand­piper, Rud­dy turn­stone, Red knot and East­ern Curlew as well pro­duc­tive man­groves, marine and coastal assets, riv­er sys­tems and many sig­nif­i­cant ter­res­tri­al species and eco­log­i­cal communities.