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Karte Conservation Park

Alerts 1

Trail closure

The Karte Conservation Park Hike trail will be closed from Thursday 22 November 2018 until Wednesday 28 November 2018 due to a pest control operation.
Details >

  • Picnic Areas
  • Campfires Permitted
  • Toilets
  • Camping
  • Walking Trails
  • Bird Watching

About

Karte Conservation Park comprises of thick, low scrub covering steep sand dunes which rise up to 40 metres. During the early twentieth century much of the surrounding land was cleared except for those areas that were unsuitable for agriculture.

Interpretive signs along the 1.5km walking trail in the park provide an insight into the importance of the area's remaining vegetation, which provides a habitat for the threatened malleefowl.

Picnic areas and campsites are located near the start of the trail and provide an opportunity to enjoy the park's vast expanse of wilderness and admire stunning views across the district. You may even encounter one of the park's residents such as the western grey kangaroos, echidnas or fat-tailed dunnarts.

Opening hours

Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Closures and safety

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may also be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

You can determine the current fire danger rating by checking the Fire Ban District map on the CFS website.

Check the CFS website or call the CFS Bushfire Information Hotline 1800 362 361 for:

Listen to your local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety.

Contact details

Natural Resource Office - Berri

Phone: (+61 8) 8580 1800

For booking enquiries please email:

DEW.SAMDBOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au

Getting there

Karte Conservation Park is located 30km north west of Pinnaroo. Access is via Pinnaroo to Loxton Road.

Assistance dogs

Assistance dogs are permitted in most public places and are therefore welcome in South Australia’s parks and reserves. Assistance dogs must be appropriately restrained on a lead and remain under your effective control at all times while in a park or reserve.

As per the dogs in parks and reserves policy, if the dog is not an accredited assistance dog, they must be trained to assist a person with a disability to alleviate that disability and meet standards of hygiene and behaviour appropriate for a dog in a public place. However, refusal may be given if the person with the disability is unable to produce evidence the dog is an assistance dog with the appropriate training.

Before taking your assistance dog into a park that does not normally allow dogs, it is highly recommended that you contact us so we can provide you with the latest information on any potential hazards within specific parks that may affect your dog. Please contact the park via the contact details provided under the contact tab or call the information line on (+61 8) 8204 1910.

Dogs not allowed

Dogs are not permitted in this park.

Discover which parks you can walk your dog in on our find a park tool or read 12 dog-friendly walks in Adelaide Parks by Good Living for inspiration.

Facilities

The Karte campground has picnic tables, toilets and fire pits available. The Karte Conservation Park hike is accessed from the campground and features interpretive signage.

Plants and animals

The vegetation in the park provides habitat for the endangered malleefowl, mallee whipbird and a number of rare orchids. More than forty species of bird call this park home.

Malleefowl

Malleefowl, as the name suggests, live in the mallee areas of Australia and are rated as nationally endangered. Large patches of unburnt mallee in South Australian parks provide important habitat for these unique birds.

Unlike most birds, malleefowl do not spend several weeks at a time sitting on eggs. Instead the eggs are buried in a sand and compost mound that produces enough heat to incubate the eggs. They dedicate up to eleven months a year caring for the nest, yet take no interest in their young once they have hatched.

Given that it's such a long and intensive process to create the right conditions for the eggs to hatch, it would be reasonable to expect that the workload is shared between the male and the female. In fact, this is not the case. The male digs and builds the mound, which is around one metre height and three metres wide. This is a complex and exhausting task. The right amount of compost has to be incorporated at the right depth. The male must wait for enough rain to wet the compost before building the upper layers of the nest. The female lays one large egg each week until she has laid 15-20 eggs. The male opens up the mound to receive each egg, then buries it to the right depth. He then regularly monitors and adjusts the nest temperature. This involves regularly 'testing' the sand at different depths, and scraping sand on and off the mound to keep it at a constant temperature.

Flora and fauna species lists

To download flora (plants) and fauna (animals) species lists for this park, use the 'Create Simple Species List' tab under 'Flora Tools' or 'Fauna Tools'  in NatureMaps

Useful information

Traditional owners

Aboriginal peoples have occupied, enjoyed and managed the lands and waters of this State for thousands of generations. For Aboriginal first nations, creation ancestors laid down the laws of the Country and bestowed a range of customary rights and obligations to the many Aboriginal Nations across our state. 

There are many places across the State that have great spiritual significance to Aboriginal first nations.  At some of these places Aboriginal cultural protocols, such as restricted access, are promoted and visitors are asked to respect the wishes of Traditional Owners.

In places where protocols are not promoted visitors are asked to show respect by not touching or removing anything, and make sure you take all your rubbish with you when you leave.

Aboriginal peoples continue to play an active role in caring for their Country, including in parks across South Australia. 

European history

During the early part of the twentieth century much of the land in the area was cleared for agriculture. The area that is now Karte Conservation Park was left uncleared as the sand dunes were unsuitable for agriculture.

In 1988, Pinnaroo Area School students, as part of a Bicentennial Project, constructed a walking trail. The Friends of Southern Mallee Parks adopted the trail and now help to maintain it.

See and do

Bushwalking

Bushwalking is a fantastic way to connect with nature, keep fit and spend time with family and friends. South Australia's national parks feature a range of trails that let you experience a diversity of landscapes.

Moderate hikes

  • Karte Conservation Park Hike (45 mins, 1.5km loop)

    Starting at the campground, this short but strenuous hike involves steep hills and spectacular views over the district. Take time to read the signs along the way that explain a little about the importance of the vegetation in the area.

Mountain biking

Mountain biking is currently not permitted in this park. 

Camping

There is three campsites available that provide an opportunity to enjoy the park's vast expanse of wilderness and admire stunning views across the district. You may even encounter one of the park's residents such as the western grey kangaroos, echidnas or fat-tailed dunnarts.

Camping fees apply in Karte Conservation Park and permits must be purchased prior to arrival.

If you are unable to book and pay online you can do so, in person, at these booking agents across the state.

Karte campground

Suitable for: tents and camper trailers.

Facilities: toilets, picnic tables and fire pits

 

Volunteering

Want to help?

To find out how you can help in this park or nearby, please visit Natural Resources South Australian Murray-Darling Basin – Volunteering.

Want to join others and become a Park Friend?

To find out more about Friends of Parks groups please visit Friends of Parks South Australia.

You could join others to help look after a park. You can take part in working bees, training and other events.

  

Safety

Bushwalking

The international Trail Users Code of Conduct is to show respect and courtesy towards other trail users at all times.

Ensure that you:

  • when hiking, wear sturdy shoes, a hat and sunscreen
  • be aware of weather conditions and avoid walking during the hottest part of the day
  • make sure you have appropriate weather proof clothing
  • carry enough water to be self-sufficient
  • please be respectful of other users at all times
  • stay on the designated trails and connector tracks for your own safety, and prevent the spread of declared weeds to other areas in the park
  • ensure someone knows your approximate location and expected time of return
  • take appropriate maps.
  • Walk, hike or trek - what's the difference?

Camping

When camping in a National Park, it's important to remember the following:

  • Always let someone responsible know your travel plans, especially when travelling in remote areas. It's a good idea to let them know when you expect to return.
  • Check the weather forecast before you leave, including overnight temperatures on the Bureau of Meteorology. Even during very mild weather, the nights can get very cold. 
  • The quality and quantity of water cannot be guaranteed within parks. Please bring plenty of water and food to be self-sufficient.
  • Always camp in designated sites (where applicable) - do not camp beneath trees with overhanging branches, as they can drop without warning. It's also a good idea to check that there no insect nests nearby.
  • Check to make sure you're not camping in a natural waterway, flash floods can happen anytime.
  • If camp fires are permitted, you must bring your own firewood, as the collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited. Extinguish your camp fire with water (not sand or dirt) until the hissing sound stops.
  • Ensure that you are familiar with the fire restrictions for this park.

Fire

Closures and safety

This park is closed on days of Catastrophic Fire Danger and may also be closed on days of Extreme Fire Danger.

You can determine the current fire danger rating by checking the Fire Ban District map on the CFS website.

Check the CFS website or call the CFS Bushfire Information Hotline 1800 362 361 for:

Listen to your local area radio station for the latest updates and information on fire safety.

Fire restrictions

  • Wood fires and solid fuel fires are prohibited from 15 November 2017 to 15 April 2018.
  • You must bring your own firewood, as the collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.
  • Gas fires are permitted through the year, other than on days of Total Fire Ban.

Know before you go

Every national park is different, each has its own unique environment, it is important to be responsible while enjoying all the park has to offer.

Please ensure that you:

  • leave your pets at home
  • do not feed birds or other animals, it promotes aggressive behaviour and an unbalanced ecology
  • do not bring generators (except where permitted), chainsaws or firearms into the park
  • leave the park as you found it - place rubbish in the bins provided or take it with you
  • abide by the road rules (maintain the speed limit)
  • respect geological and heritage sites
  • do not remove native plants
  • are considerate of other park users.

  • Important: Collection of firewood within National Parks is prohibited.

Maps

Park maps

Maps on your mobile

If you have a smartphone or tablet you can download the free Avenza PDF Map app and have interactive national park maps on hand when you need them.

The app uses your device's built-in GPS to plot your real-time location within the park onto a map. The app can be used without a network connection and without roaming charges. You can also measure area and distance, plot photos and drop placemark pins. 

How to get it working on your device:

1. Download the Avenza PDF maps app from the app store whilst you are still in range (its free!).
2. Open up the app and click the shopping cart icon.
3. Click ‘Find’ and type the name of the national park or reserve you are looking for.
4. Click on the map you are after and install it (all our maps are free).
5. You will now find a list of your installed maps on the home page of the Avenza app.
6. Use our maps through the Avenza PDF map app while in the park and never take a wrong turn again.

Fees

Entry fees

Vehicle entry to this park is free, however fees apply for camping.

Camping and accommodation

Campsites need to be booked prior to arrival.

Click through to the online booking page for more details about individual campgrounds and fees.

Book online

Book online to reserve your campsite up to 12 months in advance.

FAQs about booking online

Book and pay in person

If you are unable to book and pay online you can do so, in person, at these booking agents across the state.

For online bookings enquiries please email:

DEW.SAMDBOnlineBookings@sa.gov.au

Other fees and permits

There are no other fees or permits associated with this park. 

PDF Park Brochure
Alerts 1

Trail closure

The Karte Conservation Park Hike trail will be closed from Thursday 22 November 2018 until Wednesday 28 November 2018 due to a pest control operation.
Details >